Indie Publishing

Listen to me blather on You to the Tube | #ASMSG #BYNR |


Some of you ( most of you?) know that I have a YouTube Channel. It’s the Official Genevieve Dewey YouTube Channel, you know, in case I get outrageously famous someday. Anyway, in addition to the Music Playlists I have created for the Downey Trilogy I have done two author readings. Today I uploaded the Radio Interview I did on KLIN last Thursday for those of you who missed it. (Yes, I babble in person just as much as I babble when I blog, haha!) If you guys want YouTube to notify you when I upload new things (like readings/interviews/book trailers/additional music videos on the playlists) then hit that “Subscribe” button! I sure would appreciate it! ūüôā You know what else would be cool? If you’d leave a comment or two over there from time to time on what you liked, want more of, etc…

 


LOVE this!

Merry Farmer

Congratulations!  You’ve decided to self-publish.  Welcome to the wild and wonderful world of the fastest-growing segment of the publishing industry.

Fastest-growing, eh?

Yep.¬† Seems like you can‚Äôt turn around these days without someone sprinting off to publish the manuscript they‚Äôve been working on for years.¬† Or months.¬† Or a couple of weeks.¬† But does that mean that if you self-publish the rest of the literary world is going to ‚Äúdial you down to dumbass‚ÄĚ, as my Dad likes to say?¬† Does that mean you‚Äôve forever separated yourself from the realm of the serious author?¬† Not anymore it doesn‚Äôt.¬† But it does mean that you get to navigate a minefield of potential mistakes and problems, and you get to do it all by yourself.

Now, I consider myself to be a successful self-published author.  I’ve got three books out and one coming out the first weekend of November.  And I’ve learned…

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I *HEART* the HEA


No seriously, I am very, extremely, completely,¬†(insert adverb here), fond of the Happily Ever After. Just love it! Won’t even read or watch a movie that won’t guarantee me a HEA. Well … except for Gangster flicks. Every rule has to have an exception.

This may lead you to wonder… if Gen loves the Happily Ever After, but also loves writing about gangsters, how on earth can she reconcile the two? Well, given the theme of the Downey Trilogy is about a very moral cop who loves his gangster father, I think you should probably brace yourself for my even greater love of figuring out how¬†two opposing ideas can live in harmony.

The truth is, it’s not about the HEA, it’s that¬†I love a JUSTIFIED ending. And the HEA¬†is justified in most plot lines when it’s been earned,¬†just as¬†the nonHEA¬†is justified in certain endings, which in a way, if you think about it makes it a HEA¬†ending for certain characters. If you give a HEA out when there was never any conflict to begin with isn’t it a bit anti-climactic? Likewise, making an unhappy ending for some characters while giving others one and not really explaining why just shows you have a love for the random and not necessarily¬†a well deserved ending. See what I’m saying? No?

I know, I know … What the Hell is Gen rambling about now?

(I lobtser HATE Godfather III, but simply adore to the point of having it nearly memorized Godfather I & II, if that gives you a clue.)

Anyway, I love it when characters go through Hell. I think every author owes it to their audience to make their characters — whether these are dark characters or Mary Sue perfect characters — suffer a bit, actually quite a bit, before giving them their HEA. And similarly, I feel if you are going to write an UNhappy ending give me a damn good reason why that guy had to¬†die alone¬†next to¬†a stray dog and not the OTHER ‘bad’ guy who died surrounded by his beloved tomatoes and grandchild. Bittersweet endings have their place, like the first in a series or an actual recounting of history, but not after you’ve already made the character suffer in other ways. I’m. Just. Sayin.

Similarly, I’ve always really hated¬†Romeo and Juliet. No, it’s true. It’s not really because of the unhappy ending, it’s because of the inherent stupidity of the two main protagonists. I mean come ON! I’ve been fourteen. All passionately in luuuuurve. But faking your death, then not taking two seconds to doubt the veracity of what you’re seeing and offing yourself for real? I was never that dim-witted when I was fourteen. That’s taking hyperbole and a flair for dramatics to the extreme. No?

See, even as a teenager when first reading it I remember thinking, if I had written Romeo & Juliet it would go something like this:

Romeo gets his priest (who I think everyone realizes¬†was on the take the whole time, right?) to secure passage out of town. Juliet sews a bunch of family jewels into their clothes to pay for the journey. If they have to do the whole over-the-top faking death thing they can stage an explosion/accident (ala Count of Monte Cristo) and they both fake out not only their families but the priest himself (no witnesses!) then they go hide out in a town in Sicily and create their own Mafia family and then decades later they come back to Verona and literally take over the town, round up¬†their surviving ‘loved’ ones,¬†all¬†fuck you¬†bitches, bet you wish you’d just let us get married¬†now huh? See, then all the unreasonable warmongering ones got their just deserts and the ones who just wanted to get the hibbity on got to be together, but only after they worked hard for it. Not to mention your two main characters are no longer written as simpering morons but badass take charge entrepreneurs.

But … that’s probably just me.

I’m weird like that.

Romeo: Corleone’s that way, baby. I got a crib there and everything.
Juliet: Oh, Romeo, I lurve it when you strap your gangster on…

A whiskey in your coffee kind of day…


Sometimes you just have to let go and let it roll, you know?

I came to the sad truth last night that my children are all singularly and collectively way more funny than their mother. If I had a dollar for every time someone’s urged me to write abook about the funny things my kids say and do… but I’m reasonably certain there’s already been a coffetable book published of the cute and funny things someone else’s kid says. Of course, everything has already been published at least once. Aren’t there only like,¬†six plots in existence, really?

What was I saying?

Surely, by now you are used to the rambling. It’s what I’m internet famous for. That, and the sailor’s mouth. And my sloppy gangster love (but for¬†them old time gangsters, not the ones today who can’t even¬†define the word omerta), not to be confused with my equal sloppy love for law enforcement. Because I love them both, or rather the battle between the two. I love a good chess game, feud, or battle of wills. Better than whiskey in your coffee. Two opposites combined for an extra special zing!

So¬†just now¬†I was thinking while enjoying my Irish coffee, for every bad day like the one I was having yesterday and the day before, there’s a great day lurking around the corner. And just when you think no one but your close friends are¬†noticing, some stranger mentions¬†something in an offhand way that makes you realize maybe, sometimes,¬†you’re just as funny as a six year old.

So thank you friends and strangers for being the whiskey in my coffee!

PS– More character updates in the “More about the Downey Trilogy” tab. I also edited the Downey Family tree so it’s easier to see the age grades/generations for who is contemporaneous to whom.

Chocolate, Wine, and a Good Friend


… are the cure for the writer blues. And quite possibly everything.

I have to preface the rest of this post with a¬†disclaimer so I don’t offend the wrong people. True, those of you who know me know I don’t usually concern myself with such things, other people’s opinions of me are their problem. Two farts and tinker’s damn are three currencies more than I care about what people think of me. But, it’s best not to bite the hand that feeds you. Or takes royalties from you in exchange for allowing you to sell books … whatever. But the last thing I want to do is insult or belittle a book retailer selling my book, with whom I would like to have a long and fruitful relationship. Because I would —¬†like fruits in our relationship, that is — which¬†I hope eventually gets to be less one-sided. And then we’ll be back to being besties.

“In such cases as these, a good memory is unpardonable.” — Elizabeth Bennet, Pride¬†and Prejudice

Oh, the babbling again. Fine, I’ll get to the point.

After I released my book it took my distributor forever (alright, fine, a month) to get the book out to Apple and Barnes & Noble, meanwhile Amazon was happily providing my book to the masses. Then, immediately after stocking the book, Apple and B&N and all the rest of the retailers (except, of course, Amazon with whom I get to deal directly) had it shelved in with all the poetry and plays. Why yes, it is rather like Shakespeare … with gangsters … only not.

God damn fucking tragedy is what that was.— Mickey Downey, Second of All

‘Oh dear’, I said (in the highly sanitized Disney historical revision of events) and sent a politely worded missive to the distributor reminding them it is a Fictional novel, to be classified as Fiction & Literature. They directed me to change my genre classification and added, perhaps “romance”¬†should be¬†the category.

A rose by any other name…

Alright. *Kanye shrug*

Of course there is romance in the book. Actually¬†a good¬†bit. But if anyone is expecting in this first book the classic¬†boiler plate¬†‘boy meets girl, love and banter and sexy situation ensue followed post haste by the ubiquitous Happily Ever After’, they will be sorely disappointed. As would anyone thinking they will be getting poetry or a broadway play. But hey, I’ll play the game. Click went the finger stroke of the near real time digital age.

That was three weeks ago. Still no change.

So, yesterday in a fit of immense gratitude to Amazon I dropped the price of my book to $3.99 and shall commence, henceforth, actively leading people to purchase the book from them until Apple and B&N and Smashwords start actually communicating with each other faster than the Platte runs in September (or molasses in January for my southern fried friends). In fact, I might just start participating in their periodic giveaway and monetizing programs.

“It’s not personal. It’s business.” — Michael Corleone, The Godfather

First, I Love You

by Genevieve Dewey

On sale at Amazon for $3.99!